Check the new JOIDES Resolution schedule

on 25 March 2019
Check the new JOIDES Resolution schedule

Click the Joides Resolution schedule After the successful Ross Sea expedition in early 2018 https://iodp.tamu.edu/scienceops/expeditions/ross_sea_ice_sheet_history.html the Amundsen Sea expeditio...

The March issue of Oceanography

on 20 March 2019
The March issue of Oceanography

The March issue of Oceanography https://tos.org/oceanography/issue/volume-32-issue-01 is  a special issue on Scientific Ocean Drilling. Under the Theme 1. Climate and Ocean Change, you...

EU-PolarNet White Papers release

EU-PolarNet White Papers release

EU-PolarNet White Papers release https://www.eu-polarnet.eu/news-and-events/conferences-and-workshops/white-paper-workshop/ White Paper No. 1: The coupled polar climate system: global context, pr...

PhD in Polar Science and PhD in Science and Management of Climate Change

on 12 March 2019
PhD in Polar Science and PhD in Science and Management of Climate Change

PhD in Polar Science and PhD in Science and Management of Climate Change call for application. University of Venice (Italy).  http://www.unive.it/phd-degrees    applicati...

PAIS-IODP Antarctic School

on 07 February 2019
PAIS-IODP Antarctic School

Dates: 10–14 June 2019 Location: IODP Gulf Coast Repository, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA Deadline to apply: 27 February 2019 Website: https://usoceandiscovery.org/antar...

ECORD PROCEED Workshop

ECORD PROCEED Workshop

ECORD PROCEED Workshop - http://www.ecord.org/science/proceed/. The workshop will be held in Vienna on 6-7 April, just before the EGU 2019.  Registration is due by Februa...

ISAES 2019

on 23 January 2019
ISAES 2019

The XIII International Symposium on Antarctic Earth Science https://www.isaes2019.org:12090/home/ abstract submission deadline is 27 April 2019   Abstract submission for the XIII Intern...

Travel grants available

on 23 January 2019
Travel grants available

Submit here your travel grant request to attend conferences, workshops and schools related to PAIS

DRILLING FOR PAST ANTARCTIC CLIMATE - THEN AND NOW

on 14 June 2018
DRILLING FOR PAST ANTARCTIC CLIMATE - THEN AND NOW

  This collection of videos captures talks on this topic on the evening of 8 March, 2018, at the Lyttelton Arts Factory, New Zealand, after the return of the JOIDES Resolution from IODP...

CELEBRATING 60 YEARS OF ANTARCTIC SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND 50 YEARS OF SCIENTIFIC OCEAN DRILLING

on 06 February 2018
CELEBRATING 60 YEARS OF ANTARCTIC SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND 50 YEARS OF SCIENTIFIC OCEAN DRILLING

Guest post by co-chief scientist Laura De Santis from Instituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale (OGS): This year the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) and&n...

SCAR PAIS obituary for Gene Domack

on 06 December 2017
SCAR PAIS obituary for Gene Domack

Dr. Eugene Domack, Professor of Geological Oceanography at the University of South Florida College of Marine Science, died on Nov. 20, 2017 after a brief illness. Gene earned his Ph.D. in Geology from...

Katabatic winds diminish precipitation contribution to the Antarctic ice mass balance

on 13 October 2017
Katabatic winds diminish precipitation contribution to the Antarctic ice mass balance

A new field work study evaluates how katabatic winds can reduce the amount of precipitation actually reaching the surface. PNAS from Grazioli et al, 2017 Accumulation of precipitation is the principal...

East Antarctic ice sheet most vulnerable to Weddell Sea warming (Golledge et al., 2017)

East Antarctic ice sheet most vulnerable to Weddell Sea warming (Golledge et al., 2017)

The Recovery drainage basin in the eastern Weddell Sea will more likely be the first contributor of future ice loss from EAIS due to ocean warming. Geophysical Research Letters by Golledge et al. Anta...

Sabrina seafloor survey

Sabrina seafloor survey

https://sites.google.com/site/sabrinaseafloorsurvey This site follows the voyage of Australian, Italian, Spanish and American scientists on Australia's research vessel Investigator. Our voyage departs...

Obliquity-paced climate change recorded in Antarctic debris-covered glaciers

Obliquity-paced climate change recorded in Antarctic debris-covered glaciers

Some high-latitude glaciers are found to remain sensitive to 41 000 years obliquity variations despite a global climate paced at roughly 100 000 years. Nature communications by Mackay and Marchant. Th...

Mission report : Evaluation of the warm marine air intrusion at the French Antarctic station Dumont d’Urville using water stable isotopes as an atmospheric tracer

Mission report : Evaluation of the warm marine air intrusion at the French Antarctic station Dumont d’Urville using water stable isotopes as an atmospheric tracer

The first results of water vapour monitoring at the coastal station Dumont d'Urville will help to link the isotopes records from ice cores to the ice-ocean-atmosphere interactions. During the austral...

Antarctic last interglacial isotope peak in response to sea ice retreat, not ice-sheet collapse

Antarctic last interglacial isotope peak in response to sea ice retreat, not ice-sheet collapse

Models evaluate the impact of the collapse of the West Antarctic ice sheet and of sea ice reduction on the isotopic composition of precipitation on the East Antarctic Plateau, compared to isotopic rec...

Antarctic ice sheet discharge driven by atmosphere-ocean feedbacks at the Last Glacial Termination

Antarctic ice sheet discharge driven by atmosphere-ocean feedbacks at the Last Glacial Termination

A new ice core record provides clues on the evolution of the ice sheet in the Wedell sea during the last glacial termination which could improve the understanding of the ice-ocean-atmosphere feedback...

IODP Antarctic expeditions 2018-20

IODP Antarctic expeditions 2018-20

We want to make you aware of upcoming opportunities for Antarctic research with the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP). Two expeditions are scheduled for the 2017–2019 Antarc...

Blogs and weekly reports of the upcoming Polarstern cruise (with MeBo)

 Blogs and weekly reports of the upcoming Polarstern cruise (with MeBo)

Blogs and weekly reports of the upcoming Polarstern cruise (with MeBo) The Research Vessel Polarstern is the most important resource for German polar research and the flagship of the Alfred Wegener In...

PAIS provides funding for 1-2 students

on 13 January 2017
PAIS provides funding for 1-2 students

PAIS provides funding for 1-2 students to attend the Urbino Summer School in Paleoclimate: http://www.uniurb.it/ussp/ or other schools related to PAIS. Interested persons should contact Laur...

PAIS IODP Antarctic School

Dates: 10–14 June 2019

Location: IODP Gulf Coast Repository, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA

Deadline to apply: 27 February 2019

Websitehttps://usoceandiscovery.org/antarctic-school-2019/

School Objectives

IODP has embarked on a campaign to investigate Antarctica, its ice sheets, and the Southern Ocean by coring and logging shelf and deep water marine sediments. The first expedition, Ross Sea drilling with the JOIDES Resolution (Expedition 374), was completed in March 2018, and Amundsen Sea (Exp. 379) and Iceberg Alley (Exp. 382) will sail in early 2019. The primary scientific motivation for the new drilling expeditions is to investigate the stability of the Antarctic ice sheets under past warm environments to provide analog scenarios for ice retreat and consequent sea level rise under future climate warming. Ice and environment interpretations of Antarctic sediment cores are also crucial to improve climate and ice sheet models. To help address this, we are hosting a one week Antarctic School to provide an introduction to Antarctic paleoclimate research using sediment/rock cores. The primary goals of school are to train early career scientists to:

  • Document and interpret lithological, chemical, and physical properties of Antarctic marine sediment cores.
  • Understand how interpretation of stratigraphy and depositional environments in the context of ice, climate, and source-to-sink processes can improve our understanding of past and future Antarctica.

 

School Schedule

Mornings (Monday–Thursday) will include two lectures and an exercise targeted to a daily theme, with afternoons dedicated to hands-on activities in the Gulf Coast Repository. School participants will be divided into groups and assigned a set of cores. Each afternoon participants will collect a different dataset on their cores, rotating through four laboratories by the end of the week. The laboratories include macroscopic core description, microscopic (smear slide) analysis, physical property data and downhole logging, and chronostratigraphy (integrating bio- and magnetostratigraphy). On Friday, the final lab work will occur in the morning, with each group presenting results in the afternoon.

School Participation

We will invite ~20 early career scientists (including graduate students and post-docs) to participate in the core school. This will include ~10 U.S.-based scientists and ~10 international scientists, with some priority given to scientists working on core collected during recent Antarctic expeditions but who did not sail on those expeditions. Given the diversity of potential topics covered at the school, we envisage participants with a variety of specialties, including (but not limited to) sedimentology, paleontology, geochemistry, paleomagnetism, physical properties, downhole logging, and climate/ice sheet modeling. Travel support is available from U.S. Science Support Program (USSSP) for U.S.-based participants and the Past Antarctic Ice Sheet Dynamics (PAIS) program for international participants.

Apply to Attend

This workshop is funded by PAIS and USSSP, so we welcome applications from scientists in IODP- and SCAR-member countries. We particularly encourage applications from students and early career scientists who are conducting research on Antarctic sediment cores collected during recent expeditions but who did not participate in the expedition directly. The deadline to apply is 27 February 2019.

Your application should include the following: 

  1. Short (preferably 2 page) CV or NSF-style biographical sketch
  2. Statement of interest (1 page maximum) that indicates why you want to attend the school, how it will benefit your career, and a basic description of your planned Antarctic research
  3. Letter of support from your advisor (for students only)

Send your application materials to Denise Kulhanek (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) by 27 February 2019.

If you have questions, please contact the school organizers:

Denise Kulhanek (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Trevor Williams (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)